KS1


Materials in Year 1- Tattiebogle 3

Materials display

Tattiebogle – a Year 1 materials display

A 3D Display

This is a lovely example of a using three dimensional element on a display to add interest. The scarecrow is stuffed with straw and dressed with a variety of fabrics, papers, buttons and even a feather. The children have also added scraps to their own written work which has also been mounted and put round the display. Photographs of the making of the scarecrow show the children working on him and sorting the materials to be used.

This display was originally sent to me several years ago and formed part of my degree research.

The display in more depth

Let’s explore the detail of the display in more depth.

The green and orange colour scheme works quite well for the subject. I like the choice of dark green backing paper as it shows off both the scarecrow and the photographs.

The mounts on the main board add interest and make the photos stand out. At first it looks like triple mounting but closer examination shows that the white is simple the border round the images. A slight quibble might be that the orange of the mount does not match the display border but sometimes you just have to work with what you’ve got! If the school has a policy of using scalloped corrugated borders then we need to work with that.  Displays are not about perfection and sometimes you have to settle for ‘good enough’!

The children’s work has been double mounted using the same colours but reversed and this works really well. The use of the narrow, bright orange mount next to the fairly pale writing brings the writing forward and helps to make it more visible. The green ties it back to the main display, showing us that this work relates to the scarecrow display.  I also like the way the work has been placed, using the lines of the brick wall to keep the work straight.

Tattiebogle

Just in case you don’t know the book I highly recommend it for key stage 1. It is a wonderful optimistic tale and full of opportunities for learning across the curriculum. The book can link with literacy and PSHE as well as with science. I really think it should be in every Year 1 classroom. Making scarecrows is lots of fun too!

 


Classroom Displays – Rainy Day Reads

Classroom Displays of Project Work

Following on from the Renoir Umbrellas and as a further part of the Take One Picture 2009 project comes this excellent classroom displays idea from Caroline Lennox. Caroline is a member of the Classroom Displays Flickr group and she also has a very fine blog (Learning Parade)

In her blog post Rainy Day Reads Caroline explains more about the process of designing and making the display.

The class first explored lots of illustrated children’s books about rain from the library.

The puddles were painted based on photographs the children took in the play ground.

The wellies were made by drawing round someone wearing a pair!

I love the idea of getting the children to draw round their wellies! Isn’t it great? I’ve never done that although we’ve all drawn round children’s hands and feet or even used them to print. I think drawing round the wellies is quite inspired.
It really reminds me of a children’s book illustration but I can’t think of the name of the book. (Meh! Having one of those moments when I can picture the book cover perfectly but can’t read the title!)

It was an American book about a child posting a birthday invitation on a rainy day. Anyone know which one I mean?

Favourite Rainy Day Classroom Displays

We get plenty of rain in the UK and weather is a good focus for all sorts of classroom displays. I’d love to gather up some more display ideas on this topic.

What’s your favourite way of making a classroom display about rain?

Update :  Splish, Splosh, Sploosh

Sunflower Lily, one of our members, was inspired to have a go at this one. I think she’s done a lovely job, don’t you?
Splish, splosh, splash, sploooosh!


Classroom Displays on the blogs 1

Classroom Tree

Karens Violetbliss: Classroom Displays

Found this lovely classroom display in my travels round the blogs. Karen says:

Our veteran teacher, Melanie, but together this display which includes artwork from all of our programs from the 2 year olds fruit, the three year olds paper plate turtles and an art that I did with the kindergartens of the old tortoise using watercolor paint and a saran wrap wrinkle effect to create the cracks of the old tortoise.

I like this very much, especially the tortoises.I think it has worked really well. It’s lovely to see so many people starting blogs and including photos of their classroom displays.


On safari – a jungle in the classroom 4

Transformational classroom displays are particularly popular in early years and key stage 1 settings. This reading area has become a jungle, complete with an elephant,lion and tiger. Most of the animals have been made and painted by the children, with some adult assistance. The result is a high interest area with lots to talk about.

Making displays like this can be a huge stimulus for speaking and listening but once the display is up staff often need to make an effort to remember to keep referring to elements in the display. Adding labels and other text can re-vitalise a display. A favourite addition is laminated speech bubbles so that asking questions like “How does the elephant feel today?” can give the children even more opportunity for expression and contribute to a text rich environment.

Once children and staff get used to the display and it loses the “wow” factor, it has to go. There is a great temptation with displays like this to forget their purpose and treat them like pretty wallpaper.

Displays like this need to be treated with a little caution. Whilst it can be great fun to transform a whole classroom too much stimulation can be very challenging for some children. Keeping some areas visually quiet and uncluttered is also a consideration.


Phonics Display – Our word wall 5

Our word wall, originally uploaded by Glazgow.

Several people have asked for phonics classroom displays. I’m not surprised as they are hard to do well. One approach, that produces a really interactive display, is to go for a word wall.
Glazgow did this one with a Primary 3 (7 year olds) class in Scotland. He says

Our word wall (window actually). Has all the phonemes, the alphabet, common words (tricky words) and punctuation. It also has 6 lines which can be used to make sentences when working with the children.

This is a great working display that can be brought out year after year. It can be used by individuals, groups or for whole class teaching. All that needs to be done is to laminate everything and use lots of sticky putty.
It’s important that it is placed at child height so that it can be used easily.
I’m in two minds about using window space this way. There are good arguments both for and against. What do you think?