literacy


Quest – Sir Kit and Year 3

I blogged about the Quest Literacy Intervention Programme for Year 3  back in 2007 and I was surprised to discover today that it is still in use in some UK schools. Many of the materials needed to run the programme are still available if you hunt around so I decided to update the post and also to write a bit more about it here.

The Quest Books

The programme relies quite heavily on a selection of specific books. All of them are still available but you may need to check changes in page numbers.

You can find  all the Quest Books here on the Better Reading Partners Amazon Book Shop Quest page

The Dilly the Dinosaur books have new ISBNs:
Dilly the Dinosaur 978749746827
Dilly and the Goody Goody 07801405202497

The Shark book is also available but has different page numbers and some missing information.

I have also added the Volcano book which is still available as a pack of 6 or as individual books.

Babcock LDP has some good links to all the basics now that the original site is gone. The handbooks are there as PDF files but the advice to be cautious about printing them out is good. They are each over 60 full colour pages! Well worth downloading though and saving somewhere, maybe to a CD or pen drive?

Leicester still has the editable version of the parents leaflet which I found very useful to send out at the start of the scheme.

 


Classroom Displays – More Word Walls 8

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Classroom Displays to Rescue Tired Words!

Wandering the web looking for word wall classroom displays to share with you I found a couple of interesting sites I’d not seen before. I’ll save the other site for my next word wall post, but thought you might like this idea as much as I did.

Tired Words!

Tired words want to go to sleep.

Let them rest! Don’t make a peep!

Try to use a synonym instead.

Let those tired words stay in bed!

I found the display on Cheryl Sigmon’s Four Blocks site (There are more great ideas there so do have a look around!) Cheryl says:

Laura Croglio, a teacher at Clinton Elementary in West Seneca, NY shared this idea during my recent visit to her school, “I have my students go to the Tired Words Wall to choose a synonym for an overused word. They pull the synonym they like from the pocket, take it back to their seat to make sure they spell the word correctly (possibly adding it to their personal dictionary), and returning it to the wall when they’re finished.”

I think this is an excellent interactive word wall display. I’ve used laminated interactive word walls before, and of course word banks in various forms but I’d not seen the pocket idea.

You could even adapt a transparent shoe tidy. I’ve got one somewhere, so I might just do that to show you what I mean! That would be more versatile and hard wearing. When you design for interaction you have to remember that little fingers can be rough and paper tears easily.

Also I think I might use a mixture of interesting fonts and colours for the words. If you’ve got the time and a steady hand I’ve found that using hand written laminated words can be very helpful, especially when children are just starting to join letters.

What are your favourite ways of using interactive word wall classroom displays?

Word wall ideas on the Four Blocks site


No Said – Bulletin Board 7

no said display

No Said display board


Here’s an interesting graffiti style classroom display. At first glance this is very much a working display rather than something that’s been at all planned or designed. Look closer and you realise that the central image has been carefully chosen and executed. Giving children the ownership and freedom to contribute to the classroom displays in this way feels risky to many teachers but the results can be quite powerful.

Robert says:

Our January bulletin board was created by our class. We have kept a list of words to use instead of “said” when we write.

If I were to make suggestions for improvement it would only be to use darker pens for the words and perhaps a paler yellow background.

The words the pupils chose are interesting as well. Let’s have a look at this.

detail no said board

Use of ‘texted’ on No Said board

I wonder if the teacher would have thought of ‘typed’, ‘texted’ or ‘e-mailed’ as alternatives to ‘said’. 21stC pupils do and this is their display.

I’ve done much more managed versions of this sort of display in primary classrooms. Then we’ve usually collected a list of words from the children and either written them out on paper or typed them on the computer. These were then laminated and attached to the display with either sticky pads or putty so that they could be removed for reference. I wonder what the benefits of being just a little bit braver and handing over ownership like Robert did might have been?

No Said Bulletin Board, originally uploaded by Robert Owens.