quick display


Interactive Displays – word wall 1

IMG_1791, originally uploaded by LMH_.

This is a good example of a classroom display that was really interactive. The word wall was used by children in a multi-age Speech and Language Unit to help them with their story writing.
It’s really important for this kind of display that it was placed at a child friendly height and that children had free access to it in independent time as well as during the literacy hour. They could use it to tell oral stories to talk partners first before they did any writing.
The folders you can see at the bottom of the display contained cards more with words or pictures. The children could then use those to help them structure their story.
They could choose a ‘Who’ card from the wall, perhaps a spaceman. Write one sentence or more, depending on the age and ability of the child, about the spaceman. Then go to the ‘Where’ folder and choose a setting and so on.
Those less able might just sequence the cards whilst the more able used them to tell quite complex stories.

It’s a good technique in the mainstream classroom too and an interesting way to use a classroom display area.


Spring Classroom Displays – Kites 1

kites in KS1

Simple instructions for ‘bagged’ backgrounds


Here’s a lovely classroom display idea for a windy March afternoon in Keystage 1:
The background was done onto sheets of A3 white paper with a technique called “bagging”. It’s messy 🙂

You need

  • Shallow containers, Plastic paint roller trays work well
  • Blue and white paint (the kind that comes in squeezy bottles) Water it down a little if it seems thick.
  • Crumpled up plastic carrier bags.
  • Lots of newspaper
  • Aprons for the kids
  • 3 helpers – or to be very fast on your feet!
  • Space to put the paper to dry flat. You don’t want drips.
  • Music – optional but fun 🙂

Instructions

  • Set up 3 trays of paint.
  • Dark blue
  • Light blue (mix some white with it)
  • White
  • 3 tables with a small group of children at each and one tray.

Crumple up a carrier bag to make a ball, dip it in the dark blue paint, push it down on the flat bit of the paint tray (if you’ve used one) or onto some newspaper to remove some of the paint and then print onto the paper by dabbing it quickly. You want the bag fairly dry, not overloaded with paint.

  • Remove and replace with the next bit of paper.

I said it was messy!

  • The paper is then moved to the light blue table and the process repeated.
  • Finally it moves to the white table and repeat.
  • Paper is removed to flat surface to dry.
  • When all done and dry select best ones for background. Lettering can either be cut from spare sheets or clouds can be cut to show background through.The same technique can be used with shades of grey to make clouds.

    Cloud made with the same technique

    Or even surf 🙂


Kenyan Mat Display

Kenyan mat display, originally uploaded by norirelibjk.

This is a very effective classroom wall display that could be created in a single lesson.

Kenyan mat displayKenyan mat displayKenyan mat display

First we folded the card in half and made cuts from the folded edge. We didn’t just do straight cuts but used patterns too. We then wove strips of coloured paper through, (using Kenyan Flag colours). (the final shot shows )A finished woven paper mat ready to be laminated.

This is a lovely project and using the limited colour range of the flag makes it a better and more meaningful display. I really like this project and I think it and the accompanying Masai necklace classroom display work very well.
Kenya Masai Necklace Display 001


Classroom Displays for Christmas – the Snowman 1

Flying though the air

There is a place in school for gorgeous classroom displays like this one, that have a real, magical, ‘Wow factor’. Displays like this don’t have much input from the children, don’t showcase work. However, they can be used as a focus for speaking and listening, just so long as staff make the effort to keep referring to them.
This display would not be hard to copy. You just need some sort of shiny background for the sky area. The figures could be traced from The Snowman big book or even scanned, printed off in grey scale, blown up to A3, then coloured in with good pencil crayons and outlined in black felt pen. This version does have hand cut letters which can be time consuming. It’s always worth laminating them when you do use them and storing them for future use. I usually pop them in a plastic pocket in my folder. Oh, and don’t forget to paper clip the letters for each word. Saves lots of sorting! I think I’d get the children involved in making the houses and the trees. You might end up with a few more, and they might not be quite so similar to the book, but I still couldn’t resist getting them involved 🙂

I think having at most one “wow” display in the classroom, or better yet in shared areas, is quite acceptable. Children can be quite entranced by them and this one graced our library for a whole winter term. When the time came to take it down the children were quite sad and if I’m honest so was I 🙂 Every time I looked at it my mind supplied the first few notes of “Flying in the Air”.

When I was researching the effectiveness of different types of displays for my degree I found some interesting responses from a group of Year 5 children that slightly took me by surprise. They absolutely loved some of the “wow factor” displays and talked with great fondness of ones they remembered from previous years. Not only that, but where some of those displays had been well integrated with the work the children mixed their memories of the display with their reflections on what they had learnt. Good stuff!

So decorative classroom displays can have a greater impact on learning that you might first suppose.


Handy Santas and Angels – quick Christmas card classroom displays

handysantas

Perfectcircle says:

These were done with hand prints. the heel and thumb painted red, and the fingers white. Messy, but fun!

I think they are great fun 🙂 and I’m sure the kids did too. They also provide a jolly, almost instant Christmas display.

Here’s another gem from the same classroom:

handyangels1

These are so simple to do – everyone does one hand print in the middle, washes hands, then both hands into lovely gold paint (I think I’d be tempted to add some glitter 🙂 ). Leave to dry then decorate as desired. They’d be nice hanging from a washing line too. Talking of washing lines…..

Just to finish off, from the classroom of an old friend, how about these?

puddingcards