resources


Classroom Displays Learn The Basics 5

If you are new to making classroom displays or you are not even working in a school yet there are some basic points about classroom displays that can be a bit confusing. Once you have grasped these basic things you might want to explore a bit further and join me in the 4 week online Classroom Displays Starter Course

As with most aspects of school life the first thing to check is whether your school has a displays policy. If it does then much of how you make displays in the classroom will be laid out for you there.

Classroom Displays – Boards

Display boards are usually backed with ‘fade-less’ poster paper which is more fade resistant than ordinary papers. Occasionally sugar paper might be used but it can fade very badly.  Other materials can be used but they have to meet the fire regulations. Teachers sometimes use fabric but it should be fire retardant. There are sprays available to help with this.
The backing paper is either in rolls or sometimes A3 sheets.

Classroom displays basic supplies

See more rolls and borders in the Classroom displays Book shop

These rolls might look rather bright and that can be an issue. I go into more depth about choosing suitable colours for backing and mounting in Week 3 of the course.

Make sure you know the school etiquette before you help yourself to the displays store cupboard.  In the coming months everyone will be looking for black and dark blue for bonfire night displays. Try to be a bit more original with colours and you will find display making easier and your displays might be more interesting!

Display basics- edges of display backing paper

Display basics, showing the edges of A3 display backing paper

Some schools use A3 sheets rather than rolls. Schools vary in their paper buying policies and you just have to be adaptable. When using sheets they are placed next to each other and attached to the board with staples. You can  see it if you look closely here, from a distance the edges are not visible.
Sometimes school use rolls of plasticised paper to provide a more lasting background. These can last a whole term or even longer. Colour choices can be a bit limited but it is easy to use.

Backing paper is usually stapled into place and can often be re-used for two or three displays depending on how well it has survived.

Round the edge of the display board we usually also add a border of contrasting plain paper. It comes ready cut on a roll. Sometimes borders are scalloped or have designs on them. Plain is usually preferable as it distracts from the work less.

Mounting Work

Children’s work is usually fixed to another sheet of paper to ‘mount’ . We usually attach work by using a glue stick. If you do it carefully round the edge and a dab in the middle then it won’t wrinkle.Work can be mounted on poster paper, sugar paper or sometimes on pre-cut mounts like the ones in the photo. Mounting can be single, double or triple depending on the look of the display.

A4 Mounting Paper

A4 Mounting Paper

When the display comes down work is often given back to the children but it often remains mounted. It can be carefully removed from pre-cut mounts but it is fiddly and work can be damaged.

When mounting work it is important to note the child’s name in pencil on the back of the mounting paper before you glue it down! Best practice suggests we should unobtrusively include a small name label on each piece of work displayed but that is not always possible.
Work is usually attached to the board by stapling the mount at the corners, ideally just catching it rather than piercing the mount. This is even more important with pre-cut mounts which are too expensive not to re-use. Use the stapler at an angle to make it easy to remove staples afterwards. Drawing pins are not ideal in the classroom for health and safety reasons. Blu Tack is sometimes used but it can leave sticky marks on the backing paper and sometimes falls off after an extended period.

Occasionally double sided sticky tape can be used on displays, but I usually had to provide my own! It’s too expensive to use for displaying work. I also found stick velcro pads very useful for attaching 3d items. Spray mount isn’t often used, partly because of issues with asthmatic children. I have used it myself sometimes on display items, but only when working outside school hours.

I hope this has given you a quick insight into some classroom displays basics. If you want to know more then why not have a look at the Classroom Displays Starter Course?

If you are a seasoned display maker, thank you for reading this far! Please leave your tips and suggestions in the comments section. What do you wish someone had told you about making classroom displays when you started?

 


Quest – Sir Kit and Year 3

I blogged about the Quest Literacy Intervention Programme for Year 3  back in 2007 and I was surprised to discover today that it is still in use in some UK schools. Many of the materials needed to run the programme are still available if you hunt around so I decided to update the post and also to write a bit more about it here.

The Quest Books

The programme relies quite heavily on a selection of specific books. All of them are still available but you may need to check changes in page numbers.

You can find  all the Quest Books here on the Better Reading Partners Amazon Book Shop Quest page

The Dilly the Dinosaur books have new ISBNs:
Dilly the Dinosaur 978749746827
Dilly and the Goody Goody 07801405202497

The Shark book is also available but has different page numbers and some missing information.

I have also added the Volcano book which is still available as a pack of 6 or as individual books.

Babcock LDP has some good links to all the basics now that the original site is gone. The handbooks are there as PDF files but the advice to be cautious about printing them out is good. They are each over 60 full colour pages! Well worth downloading though and saving somewhere, maybe to a CD or pen drive?

Leicester still has the editable version of the parents leaflet which I found very useful to send out at the start of the scheme.

 


Remembrance Day Displays Poppies


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I love this display for Remembrance Day. The colours work so well together. The black backing paper provides a perfect neutral background for the red of the children’s work and the lettering. The use of a bright green accent as thin border on the board is then repeated as a mount for the work.
Usually I don’t like ‘fussy cutting’ children’s drawings but on this occasion it has worked well. I know I always tell people to position work using guidelines but on this occasion the angles have been carefully balanced. It’s a great visual skill if you can do this but it is hard to get it right. This does.

You can find some really good Remembrance resources including editable poppies, crosses and writing frames at Teachers Pet

IMGP3696, originally uploaded by Emu582


Sparklebox Alternatives – part 2 8

Sparklebox Alternatives is Part 2 in an ongoing series on the blog. Read Part 1

“Do you know of any alternatives to Sparklebox ?”- this subject still keeps coming up in my email, in direct messages on twitter and in face to face INSET days.

Here are 3 more useful sites for classroom display resources:

Mrs Pancake

Wonderful, creative, useful and very helpful the team at Mrs Pancake are a great source of interesting and innovative display materials. I have written about their resources before and they just keep getting better! They ask for a donation of between £0:50 and £1:50 for their downloads and use an honour system. There is no need to sign up or sign in. The site uses some advertising.




Mrs Pancake was created in a small design studio in Belfast, founded by a husband and wife team. Until recently we also worked as volunteer youth workers so we have full POCVA (Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults) checks. There are now three of us working as professional illustrators, designers, webby types, animators, consultants… we’re multi-taskers here.
We call ourselves a Responsible Design partnership which means we think and design for businesses and non-profits who share our passion for creativity, design thinking, transparency, responsibility in business and creating organisations with a positive net effect. We love what we do and it shows.
We have a passion for creating great educational experiences for tiny people and many of the projects we work on have an education slant. For example we helped BBC Northern Ireland and Sesame Workshop create an online world for Sesame Tree – the Northern Irish Sesame Street spin-off. This has been hailed as a huge success and schools across Northern Ireland use the resource as part of the curriculum.
We have also developed A wonderful Story – a children’s book and animation that teaches the benefit of seeing good in others and passing on encouragement. This is also being used throughout classrooms in  Northern Ireland as part of the Personal Development curriculum.
Mrs Pancake was born out of the frustration of lack of good quality classroom resources. We have a lot of teacher friends and enjoyed helping them make their classrooms more enjoyable places for their pupils. When we kept getting more and more requests we thought that it was finally time to put our resources online for any teacher to download freely and Mrs Pancake was created.
It has been a real labour of love, we run a busy studio so Mrs Pancake gets tended to during lunchtimes and spare moments. We love hearing the feedback though and we get to illustrate elves and monkeys and test out our craft ideas so we love our Mrs P times!
Heather, Pete and Karys

Primary School Teaching

Update – no longer available. This was a rather different sort of site. Primary School Teaching was based on resource sharing. Teachers contribute resources and earn a share in the advertising revenue based on the number of times their resource page is viewed. It’s early days for the site but there is some promising sharing going on. John and Lydia are young, energetic and committed.

John and I run the site together. John does all the technical work and I market the site and provide resources for it. I am a trainee primary teacher currently studying at York St John University.
Primary School Teaching is a free service for teachers to share their lesson plans and resources. Not only can you access resources easily but you can edit other people’s resources to improve them and keep them up to date.

Primary Technology is a young, energetic company with a range of skills covering almost all areas of ICT in primary education. Since 2004, we have provided onsite ICT services to primary schools in Yorkshire which has helped us to develop a company-wide expertise in the primary education sector.

We use our expertise to develop new and innovative hosted services for education, with a focus on web 2.0 and collaborative learning.

Primary School Teaching is a social networking and resource sharing site made exclusively for Primary School Teachers.

We also welcome other members of staff working in Primary Schools who may also find Primary School Teaching a valuable resource.

Primary School Teaching is a platform for sharing and ranking teaching resources and ideas. It allows teachers to communicate effectively in a collaborative environment, working to create exciting and engaging teaching.

Teachable

Teachable is another teacher resource sharing site. This time it is not free but charges a small fee, half of which is paid to the teacher responsible for the resource.  The resources are mostly worksheets and lesson plans at the moment but it’s worth keeping a look out for displays stuff, or even contributing your own! All the resources are checked and vetted before they are approved but I’ll let Edward explain more:

‘Heroic’ is a word that applies to many of our teachers, and often their efforts go unsung and unsupported. Providing access to cost-effective top-quality resources is Teachable’s mission is to enhance education quality and to empower teachers who in turn empower our children.Teachers can browse and search for relevant resources matched to a subject, topic, age group and ability level.  By encouraging teacher feedback, and providing easy previews, Teachable.net makes it as quick as possible to find the best material.  A continuing flow of new resources is sourced from contributing teachers (over 500 so far) earning a half share of all revenue we make from their files.  We now have over 200 files for KS1 and nearly 1000 for KS2.

Teachable Ltd is a social enterprise, funded by private capital but with a specific commitment to use funds to improve teachers working lives, and reinvest a share of revenue in the teaching community.  It does not receive government grants or charitable handouts, but instead exists by charging schools and end-users for the content they use.  The founders believe in a fair, efficient and sustainable way to deliver educational materials in the Internet age.

Edward Upton founded Teachable at the age of 27, with a passion to improve the way the internet is helps teachers’ teach.  Edward wrote his first educational software aged 12, and has first-hand experience of using self-service educational materials when he taught himself GCSEs from home.  He is a scientist by nature, and youth winner of the Royal Society Gold Award for Biology.  Edward is happily married and CRB checked!

So there you are 3 more great alternatives to Sparklebox for you to check out. Watch out for another post in this series soon!


Planning Displays 2

Classroom Displays Group
1. 3D Art Display, 2. Medusa, 3. sunflowerdisplay.jpg, 4. Sunflowers and Bees – detail, 5. seasidedisplay.jpg, 6. Asset Map – Detail, 7. School Project Asset Map, 8. Class 3H Pirate Day Display, 9. 1st Grade, 10. Women’s History Month, 11. Land Use, 12. The Romans, 13. DoReMiFaSoLaTiDo, 14. DoReMiFaSoLaTiDo, 15. DoReMiFaSoLaTiDo, 16. DoReMiFaSoLaTiDo

Created with fd’s Flickr Toys.
Three years ago, when I started the Classroom Displays group on Flickr, I had a vision of great displays all over the world being torn down and vanishing for ever at this time of year. All that work and all those great learning ideas gone. Whilst in other classrooms, or even down the corridor, other people were tearing their hair out trying to think of new ideas. I wanted to find a way to change that.

There are well over 700 images in the group pool now and over 150 active members from all over the world. The group is growing faster now than ever before and there are some fantastic images of displays as you can see from this slideshow.

David over at Booruch (sadly no longer available) describes in his podcast how he used the Classroom Displays Group on Flickr to help him plan next terms displays with his classroom assistant. They spent a Friday afternoon with the slideshow from the group up the interactive whiteboard and used the images as the basis of a discussion. This seems to me a really powerful way of working with the inspiration that the group provides, collaboratively analysing and reflecting on what they saw, seeing how it might fit or jar with their context.
I also think this is a great use of the whiteboard for staff development. This is a tool that the children are used to using for their learning but it can be just as powerful a learning tool for staff.