word walls


Classroom Displays – More Word Walls 8

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Classroom Displays to Rescue Tired Words!

Wandering the web looking for word wall classroom displays to share with you I found a couple of interesting sites I’d not seen before. I’ll save the other site for my next word wall post, but thought you might like this idea as much as I did.

Tired Words!

Tired words want to go to sleep.

Let them rest! Don’t make a peep!

Try to use a synonym instead.

Let those tired words stay in bed!

I found the display on Cheryl Sigmon’s Four Blocks site (There are more great ideas there so do have a look around!) Cheryl says:

Laura Croglio, a teacher at Clinton Elementary in West Seneca, NY shared this idea during my recent visit to her school, “I have my students go to the Tired Words Wall to choose a synonym for an overused word. They pull the synonym they like from the pocket, take it back to their seat to make sure they spell the word correctly (possibly adding it to their personal dictionary), and returning it to the wall when they’re finished.”

I think this is an excellent interactive word wall display. I’ve used laminated interactive word walls before, and of course word banks in various forms but I’d not seen the pocket idea.

You could even adapt a transparent shoe tidy. I’ve got one somewhere, so I might just do that to show you what I mean! That would be more versatile and hard wearing. When you design for interaction you have to remember that little fingers can be rough and paper tears easily.

Also I think I might use a mixture of interesting fonts and colours for the words. If you’ve got the time and a steady hand I’ve found that using hand written laminated words can be very helpful, especially when children are just starting to join letters.

What are your favourite ways of using interactive word wall classroom displays?

Word wall ideas on the Four Blocks site


An Interactive Story Starters Wall Display 4

Story Starters, originally uploaded by Glazgow.

You can’t have too many ideas for story starter classroom displays. Here’s another gem and this time the phrases have come from the class:

The children did a “Walkabout, Talkabout” and came up with all the ideas for Where, When, Who and What could happen in a story.

They now use the display to help them chose characters, setting etc for their story writing.

I like the use of colour in this display. The colours actually add meaning helping the children to classify the phrases. It’s also not too busy.
Story Starters
Using the class to generate the scenarios and phrases is much more powerful than just providing them.They will feel more ownership of the display if they know it is based on their ideas. It is just vitally important that the staff resist the temptation to just pop up the same words next year, as they’ve got them already laminated 🙁 This sort of recycling happens too often and when it does engaging classroom displays lose much of their impact.